Listen to The Gospel ofJohn


The name of the author of the Gospel of John is not mentioned – as is the case with the three synoptic gospels as well. The writer steps back into the background, behind the message of God. John was an eyewitness of the reported occurrences though, as he himself writes (John 1:14; John 19:35). In fact, only an eyewitness would be able to give such clear particulars as “about the tenth hour” (John 1:39), “six water pots of stone” (John 2:6) and “153 great fishes” (John 21:11).

Five times, the author of the Gospel calls himself “the disciple, whom Jesus loved” (compare John 21:24 with ch. 13:23; 19:26; 20:2; 21:7+20) and several times “the other disciple” (John 18:15; John 20:2-3; John 20:8). Of the three disciples who were most intimate with the Lord Jesus (which are Peter, James and John) the latter is never mentioned throughout the whole Gospel. This reserve would confirm the tradition of the old church that John, the disciple of the Lord, is the author of this Gospel. This is confirmed by Irenaeus (140 to 202 AD) who was a pupil of Polycarp of Smyrna (who himself had known John). Theophilus of Antioch quoted the first verse of the gospel around 180 AD and named John as author. There have been, however, other presumptions in the past as well as in recent times. According to some a Presbyterian by the same name shall have been the author. However, there are no irrefutable proofs against the authorship of John.

We know more of John than we know of any other author of the Gospels. He was one of the two sons of Zebedee. Zebedee was probably a prosperous fishermen on the shore of lake Galilee and he employed hired servants (Mark 1:19-20). John and James’ mother was Salome (Math. 27:55-56; Mark 15:40). She bade the Lord Jesus to have her two sons sit on His right and His left hand in his kingdom (Math. 20:20).

Intro to John
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

It's Your Turn. Write Something. Say Something.