IN THE BEGINNING: CREATION – Genesis One – Part Two


And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day.

And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters.

And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so.

And God called the firmament Heaven.

And there was evening and there was morning, a second day.

And God said, Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear: and it was so.

And God called the dry land Earth; and the gathering together of the waters called he Seas: and God saw that it was good.

And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so.

And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good.

And there was evening and there was morning, a third day.

Genesis 1:5‭-‬13 ASV

Verse 5
“And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day.”

Although this verse appears to mean that the separation of light and darkness was the same as creating Day and Night, this meaning is not consistent with the appearance of the sun and moon on the fourth day. It is likely that light and darkness in some cosmic sense were divided on the first day.

“And there was evening and there was morning, one day …”

This is generally hailed as requiring that the days of Genesis 1 be understood strictly as twenty-four hour periods of time, answering in every way to our days of the week in an ordinary sense, but tremendous words of caution against such a view are thundered from the pages of inspiration.

The very basis for calculating days and nights did not appear in this narrative until the fourth day; and that forbids any dogmatic restriction based upon our methods of calculating days and nights.

It certainly did not require any twenty-four hours for God to say, “Let there be light”, and our understanding that God’s creation was by fiat, that He spoke the worlds into existence, and that all things appeared instantly upon the Divine word, forbid any notion that Almighty God required a time budget in any of His creative acts.

Certainly, we reject any view that puts God to work for uncounted billions of years in the production of that creation which is now visible to man.

We find no fault whatever with the view that the “days” here were indeed very brief periods such as our days.

For ages, devout souls have taken exactly that view of them; and no one can prove that they were wrong.

However, “days” are surely mentioned here; and before deciding that we know exactly the duration of them, there is a point of wisdom in remembering that God has revealed some things in the Bible which shed a great deal of light upon this very question:

“But forget not this one thing, beloved, that ONE DAY is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as ONE DAY” (2 Peter 3:8).

For a thousand years in thy sight are but as YESTERDAY when it is past, and as a watch in the night (Psalms 90:4).

The apostle Paul referred to the entire present dispensation of the grace of God as “the DAY of salvation” (2 Corinthians 6:2).

“For he hath said somewhere of the seventh day on this wise, God rested on the seventh day … seeing therefore that it remaineth that some should enter thereinto … let us therefore give diligence to enter into that rest (Hebrews 4:4,6,11).

Without any doubt whatever, the last of the passage cited above denominates all of the period of time following the sixth day of creation and reaching all the way to the final Judgment as “the seventh day.”

When it is considered that the very same day mentioned here in Genesis and called here the “seventh day,” using the very same word for “day” as was used for the other six days, there appears to be imposed upon us the utmost restraints and caution with reference to any dogmatic postulations about exactly HOW LONG any of those days was.

The Bishop of Edinburgh’s comment on the above passage from Hebrews is an emphatic statement of what this writer believes the passage means: From this argument, we must conclude that the seventh day of God’s rest, which followed the six days of His work of creation, is not yet completed.

“And there was evening and there was morning, one day …”

There are many views, held by many respected, and not so qualified individuals, regarding what this means:

Some see it as the Hebrew method of reckoning days from sunset to sunset, concluding therefore that these were ordinary twenty-four hour days.

Some see their meaning as an implication, that each day had its beginning and its close.

Others connect the words with progression from darkness to light, a movement upward to higher and higher forms of life in the cycle of creation.

A number have viewed this as a reference to “the day” the inspired writer, Moses, was given the vision of God’s days of creation, corresponding somewhat to the successive visions of Revelation.

“One day …” Significantly, the entire six days of creation are spoken of as a SINGLE DAY in Genesis 2:4, “In the day that Jehovah God made earth and heaven.”

There are serious objections to receiving any of the “explanations” mentioned above.

Any basis for dogmatic assurance concerning exactly what is meant by the days of this chapter has eluded us; and we therefore leave it as one of the “secret things which belong unto Jehovah our God” (Deuteronomy 29:29).

There is certainly no impediment to a childlike acceptance of the days of Genesis as ordinary days in exactly the same manner that the first generation to receive this revelation in all probability accepted them, as most of our parents understood them, and as every soul humbled by a consciousness of the phenomenal ignorance of mankind may also find joy in believing and accepting them, fully aware, of course, that there may be, indeed must be, oceans of truth concerning what is revealed here that men shall never know until we see our Savior face to face.

THE SECOND DAY

Verses 6-8

“And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters. And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so. And God called the firmament Heaven. And there was evening and there was morning, a second day.”

The creation of the earth’s atmosphere was God’s work on the second day of creation.

The term “firmament” carries the meaning of an expanse … the beating out as of a plate of metal, suggesting the utility of a shield, an apt figure indeed when it is recalled that the earth would long ago have been destroyed by showers of meteorites (as upon the moon) had it not been for the protection of our atmosphere.

“Divide the waters from the waters …”

Water exists upon earth in both liquid and vapor forms, and it is precisely the atmosphere which separates these.

By the creation of an atmosphere, the lighter parts of the waters which overspread the earth’s surface were drawn up and suspended in the visible heavens, while the larger and heavier mass remained below. The air was thus `in the midst of the waters.’

Men should marvel indeed at this creation, when it is remembered that millions and billions of tons of water are constantly suspended in the atmosphere in the form of clouds; and of course being much heavier than the atmosphere, only an act of creation could have accomplished such a thing.

The patriarch Job marveled at this wonder:

“Dost thou know the balancing of the clouds, The wondrous works of Him who is perfect in knowledge?” – Job 37:16

Some have considered it strange that such an expression as, “divide the waters from the waters” should have been used here, but, as it must be true in countless other instances, God was limited in His communication with mankind, not by any limitation within Himself, but by the limitations within man.

In the days when this revelation was given, The Hebrew had no word for gas (vapors).

Therefore, God said, “Divide the waters (liquid) from the waters (gaseous).”

“And God called the firmament Heaven …”

This is the lower heaven of the earth’s atmosphere. See Genesis Part One

THE THIRD DAY

Verses 9-10

“And God said, Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear; and it was so. And God called the dry land Earth; and the gathering together of the waters called the Seas: and God saw that it was good.”

There is far more than sufficient water upon the earth to inundate all of the continents and the highest mountains; and it took an act of creation to separate the dry land from the seas. Nothing is revealed here as to HOW God did this. Many things might have entered into it.

The stacking of water miles deep upon the polar caps of the earth, the fracture of the earth’s crust by mighty cracks, and earthquakes thrusting above the primeval seas, the continents, and the mighty mountain systems are things which men suppose took place.

“Let the waters be gathered together … unto one place …”

One who examines a global map of the earth will see that the oceans are all connected literally, in “one place.” And yet a division among the seas is inherently in the very word “seas” (plural).

There can be no adequate explanation of this accuracy apart from understanding it as inspired of God.

Neither Moses, nor any other writer of that ancient time, had any personal knowledge that could have led to such a statement.

Verses 11-13
“And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth; and it was so. And the earth brought forth grass, herbs, yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind; and God saw that it was good. And there was evening and there was morning, a third day.”

It is the entire kingdom of plant life, or vegetation, that appeared on the third day, not simultaneously with the divisions of the seas and dry land, but in a separate creative act.

“Yielding seed … after their kind …”

Here is the law that like produces like. This eternal law of God regarding life yielding seed “after their kind” has never been repealed.

The mutations that men are able to induce, or that infrequently appear of their own accord, are overwhelmingly inclined to be harmful and not helpful, frustrating completely the theories of evolution which are totally inadequate as an explanation of various species of either plants or animals.

“And God saw that it was good …”

This statement occurs seven times in this dignified, compact narrative.

All of God’s creative actions were well-pleasing to their Creator; and God recognized them as perfect and entire.

The completeness of these actions is also inherent in such a statement as this.

Mark 16:16
“Today, in this Day The Lord has made. And these are the times through which God has decided we shall live.” Check out the Todd Herman Show Podcast. Once a guest host for Rush Limbaugh, Todd is a Christian talk show host, who has put God at the center and politics at the edges of his show. Click on image to go to thetoddhermanshow.com and listen to the podcast for free.

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